Origin of Warehouse Parties

Origin of Warehouse Parties

­­I don’t know about you, but this year I felt like Halloween was a long, dragged out holiday. There were parties for five nights straight! Saturday night I had the pleasure of attending one in a warehouse off Airport Way South in Seattle. This party went from ten at night till six Sunday morning, not many parties last this long. The name of the venue: Cocoon was not well-known by any means. When viewing info about the party before heading out, there was no venue address displayed. It wasn’t until I made the effort to contact a friend who invited me that I learned the location.

Underground parties like these are my favorite, because the host or hostess can control the amount of guests by simply relying on word-of-mouth to get information about the fete’ out there. I find that the music is always better at these parties too. DJs seem more inspired to create and spin sets that really get the crowd grooving. The mindset of the partygoers always seems more enthusiastic and positive than the typical clubbing counterparts crawling around the city on any given Saturday night.

The origin of warehouse parties dates back to the 1950’s in London, when there was an underground movement with the bohemians who lived during the era. The mods tried to bring the trend back in the 60’s once again in the UK, but were unsuccessful. It wasn’t until the 80’s that warehouse parties appeared on the fringe again. This was at a time that society as a whole was undertaking a new transformation from the experimental 70’s to the individualism and massive consumerism happening in the mid to late 80’s.